Friday, May 17, 2019

No Worries

I found out my license expired when I tried to pick up my rental car in the Savannah airport. The rental car company said, 'no problem.' Just go get a temporary license. I opened my laptop in the airport and began filling out the forms online for NY state. On the third page I found out that I needed an eye exam to do an online renewal because I have glasses, but no problem. You just pop into a Lenscrafters and get a form filled out. Nick and I drive around and Lenscrafter is closed but there's an optometrist office in the Wal-Mart. I'm thinking 'wow, life is so convenient: online renewal, Wal-Mart optometrist, quick forms.' I pop into the Wal-Mart optometrist and they're booked. No worries I'll come back tomorrow. I get back the new day and tell the clerk 'I just need this form signed. My vision is fine.' They test me for cataracts, repeatedly ask 'do you want to get your eyes dilated?' No. I'm trying to rent a car...like now. I heard the optometrist in the exam room waxing philosophically to a client. I just want to be a New Yorker and electric slide into the office like 'excuse can you just sign this form?' I resist b/c I'm trying to chill and 'no worries'... there are walk-in hours.

We go get lunch and I come back for walk-in hours. I waited two hours and I was told that I could come back in the morning. No worries...just come back at 8am. I started taking a Lyft around b/c I have a month-long pass that gives me $8 off the first 30 ride so short-distance rides are free. In NYC I've used the app about 20 times in the last month and only paid the optional tip of $1-2. I rode around for free, talked to the drivers. I Lyft'ed to the Wal-Mart the next day at 8am sharp. As I'm was waiting for the optometrist I replayed Beyonce's cover of "Before I Let You Go" in my head. An employee caught me dancing and was like 'heeey, you doing the stinky leg' and an impromptu dance party started in the vitamin section. The optometrist came and I explained that I just needed him to sign the form. He starts talking about the nature of the eye. This goes on for about 10 minutes. What is going on? Well, fuck it. If he's going to talk this much I'm going to record him. Maybe I can use it for a character later. He gives me permission and I record a half-hour of him talking about the eye. The exam itself took about 2 minutes. At the end of our 40 min session, he was like 'yeah, your eyes are fine.' He gave me the forms, I raced across the street to UPS, filled out my renewal online, got a temporary license, and printed it out. Then I took a 'free' Lyft to the nearest airport to rent a car where I ran to the rental counter: car please! No worries, the clerk told me they only had an SUV. I thought 'fine, whatever. Just give it to me." They said it would cost $500. For 2 1/2 days? Now, could I pay $500? Yes? Should I pay that when I'm riding around in Lyfts for free? I walked outside and took a Lyft back to the condo I'm staying at...maybe this happened for a reason. All these people I met, all these little stories. I decided that I don't need a rental car. I Lyft to my next appointment. The next day I walked to my interview. No worries. Someone else picked me up to go to another meeting, and toward the end of the afternoon, the AD of the theatre down here gave me his car for the last two days.

No worries.

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Killing Anger


From a reliable source...I heard that before Singleton had his fatal stroke he was flying out to shoot something and he vowed to 'have it out' with one of the creatives on SNOWFALL. He had been unhappy with a lot of thing on the show. Apparently, this confrontation/argument/whatever happened. A day or so later he had a stroke. I heard this info a few days ago and I was processing it. I don't share this to cast aspersions on SNOWFALL because I don't know the particulars. Even though I have heard numerous stories about the toxicity of their writers' room, I don't know what the argument was about or who was right....but does it matter? I'm trying to think of a creative argument worth having that would justify me losing my health or life....and I can't think of one.

My Dad worked as a teacher for over 30 years. The year before he retired I went down to Miami and observed him in the classroom. Something had shifted. He had become angry at the kids. I told him 'please don't yell at them.' He looked insulted, like I was taking their side in the generational arguments. But I was trying to reach him. He didn't work out, he ate bad food...but he had been a sort of jolly fat man for most of my life. I told him that he was now adding anger/stress into the equation of junk food/sedentary life. The people in my family like to say we have 'good genes.' We can get by on eating shit and sitting on our ass and no one has a heart attack or dies in their 40s or even 50s. I actually have grandfathers and grandmothers who died peacefully in their sleep at an old age...without the terror of hospitals or tubes and monitors.  But we can't add stress. The second we do that it's eliminated every single one of my family members. My Dad laughed at my thesis. When he drove me to the airport I repeated what I said a few more times. He kept ' Okay, Dr. Squire' in a sarcastic tone. The discussion continued via text as I was waiting to board my plane. Almost a week later he was in the hospital with a massive stroke. Once that stroke happened, he was hit with several more. This was a year before retiring with full pension/benefits. He planned on retiring and traveling across American in a Winnebago with my mom. Now he had 18 months to live according to most doctors. Miraculously, he's still around 13 years later because...well, remember what I said about the genes? But his physical/mental abilities have degenerated significantly. He's bed bound. The Winnebago tour never happened. Whenever I see him I wonder about those last few arguments before the first stroke: what was he arguing about with the kids or his boss? Was it worth it? Could he even remember?

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Mitchelville, South Carolina: #1

Down here in Hilton Head doing research about Mitchelville, the first town of Black freedmen in America and apart of an 'experiment' during the Civil War. The Union Navy beat the Confederates and decided to set up a blockade in South Carolina and to deplete the South's income since a lot of it came from sea island cotton and indigo bricks off the coast. The Union soldiers arrive on the Gullah islands to find...99% Black ppl, some black drivers, some white overseers, and no slave owners. It was hard living and the islands were filled with mosquitos that spread malaria and yellow fever, so slave owners didn't live there. The slaves lived in a semi-independent existence where they worked on a task system. They were given a daily quota of how much cotton or rice they had to bring in, and if they brought it in...they could chill for the rest of the day. As a result of no meddling slave owners and some daily flexibility, Geechee Gullah plantations were not only more productive than plantations in most of the South, but the slaves were stronger, more independent and had much more control over their communities

Union Generals didn't know what to do with the Gullah population, so they freed them! Yay!! End of story, everybody lived their dreams, prospered, pursued happiness and...no? No. President Lincoln rescinded that order, which must have made for a very uncomfortable 'see what had happen was' conversation between the Union general and Gullah ppl. 'Remember what I said before about you being free? So, yay, um..see, what had happen was...'

Lincoln wanted to use the Gullah ppl as leverage with the South. So the people were neither free nor totally enslaved. They were in limbo as war contraband in possession of the North until further negotiations. They started Mitchelville, a prosperous self-governing town they named after Union General Ormsby Mitchel. It was called the Port Royal Experiment because the Union wanted to see if Black ppl could govern themselves. Spoiler alert: we can if you get the fuck outta our way.

Gullahs said 'we want to fight with you! Give us some weapon and we'll go get those dern Confederates for you.' Union Generals replied "You want weapons to fight? Wow, thank you so much for your offer. But we don't trust-, I mean you might ki-.. you're too freaking stron-... just stay right there. And don't be too independent!' (Oh, white liberals allies ain't never changed.) Anyway, Lincoln began selling off the South's land, which is the primary source of wealth so that the Confederates would negotiate and end to the war. He kept the slaves on lockdown.

Finally Lincoln said 'okay, well...um, I guess you're free. Here's a Proclamation. And I'm going to give you want you want.' White slave owners wanted reparations for the loss of property...aka human beings walking around without their permission. The government granted them that. Black freedmen said 'just give us 40 acres and a mule and leave us ALONE!' Lincoln said 'I'll get right on that...as long as I don't get shot or something like that.' Oops. 40 acres and a mule and reparations went away with an assassin's bullet. White slave owners still got their reparations, and black people got sharecropping and 100 more years of terrorism and serfdom.

Thursday, May 2, 2019

GET WHAT YOU WANT: MAY 2019


1. ALICE JUDSON HAYES FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: May 15th
website: https://ragdale.submittable.com/submit/137680/2020-alice-judson-hayes-fellowship

The Alice Judson Hayes Writing Fellowship is an annual award in memory of Alice Hayes, who created the Ragdale Foundation in what had been her family home. All her life she was committed to working for a just and peaceful world. An 18- or 25-day residency, free of charge, and a $500 stipend will be given to a writer who is working on a project designed to bring awareness to a contemporary issue having to do with peace, social justice, education, or the environment. Projects can be nonfiction or fiction (including journalism, essays, memoir, script-writing, creative nonfiction). No academic writing.

One Alice Judson Hayes Fellowship is awarded annually. Ragdale encourages applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics, and to that end, emerging as well as established artists are invited to apply. While there are no publication, exhibition or performance requirements for application, applicants should be working at the professional level in their fields.

Ragdale encourages artists of all backgrounds to apply, and does not discriminate against anyone on the basis of age, disability, gender, origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.


2. AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL - PLAYWRITING COMPETITION
Deadline: May 15th
website: https://austinfilmfestival.com/submit/play/

Three finalists from the Playwriting Competition will have live readings during the festival which will be performed in front of an audience including the industry professionals already in attendance at the Conference. One winner will be selected and will receive a $1000 cash prize, AFF’s Bronze Typewriter Award, and reimbursements of up to $500 for travel and up to $500 for lodging if used during the 2019 Festival. There is a $25 application fee.

At Austin Film Festival, our mission is to champion all writers across mediums. Our Playwriting Competition (open to full-length plays) gives playwrights a chance to explore our film and television conference. It will also allow film professionals to discover storytellers who have mastered the art and craft of stage drama.

AFF has always promoted story as the most important element of film and TV. So giving playwrights their own story exposure and a chance of crossover into film and TV only advances our mission. There are many other playwriting competitions out there, but AFF offers playwrights broader access to successful writers and professionals in all the other related fields.


3. MCCOLL ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE
Deadline: May 15th
website: https://mccollcenter.org/apply/

Since 1999, McColl Center has partnered annually with Atrium Health, one of the leading healthcare organizations in the Southeast, to support one artist-in-residence in a medical setting in order to explore how the arts can extend or enhance healthcare and healing. Artists-in-residence in this program have worked in various areas of the healthcare system, facilitating opportunities for self-reflection and creative expression for patients and staff.

McColl Center seeks project proposals from local and regional artists for the winter/spring 2020 season. Artists may work in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, new media, or interdisciplinary practices. We look for artists who are engaged in research and investigation and who are interested in the healthcare system as both site and subject for their work. Successful proposals will clearly state how the artist’s project will advance the theme of healthcare and healing and actively engage Atrium patients and/or staff.

Selected artists receive:

$2,000 stipend which includes living, materials, and travel (United States-based artists only; due to the limitations of B-1 visas, international artists are not eligible to receive stipends)
Furnished apartment (for artists from outside the greater Charlotte area)
24-hour access to a private studio with Wi-Fi and common use areas
Participation in a group exhibition on the second and/or third floor of McColl Center
Photo and social media documentation
Technical and administrative services
Professional guidance from a visiting curator
Opportunities to engage with McColl Center audiences via public programs


4. PEN AMERICA WRITING FOR JUSTICE
Deadline: May 15th
website: https://pen.org/writing-justice-application/

PEN America’s Writing for Justice Fellowship will commission six writers—emerging or established—to create written works of lasting merit that illuminate critical issues related to mass incarceration and catalyze public debate.

The PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship aims to harness the power of writers and writing in bearing witness to the societal consequences of mass incarceration by capturing and sharing the stories of incarcerated individuals, their families, communities, and the wider impact of the criminal justice system. Our goal is to ignite a broad, sustained conversation about the dangers of over-incarceration and the imperative to mobilize behind rational and humane policies. As an organization of writers dedicated to promoting free expression and informed discourse, PEN America is honored to have been entrusted by the Art for Justice Fund to engage the literary community in addressing this pressing societal issue.

The Writing for Justice Fellowship is open-genre, and proposed writing projects, which must be authored by the applicant, may include—but are not limited to—fictional stories; works of literary or long-form journalism; theatrical scripts; memoirs; poetry collections; or multimedia projects. The most competitive applications will demonstrate how the proposed project will engage issues of reform, fuel public debate, crystallize concepts of reform, and facilitate the possibility of societal change. As part of our mission to stimulate discussion, emphasis will be placed on proposed projects that show strong promise for publication. Fellows must commit to contribute actively to bringing attention to their work and that of other Fellows. The Fellowship is open to writers at any stage of their career. Currently and formerly incarcerated writers are highly encouraged to apply, and special provisions will be made for incarcerated writers to participate through alternative methods.

Fellows will receive an honorarium of between $5,000-$10,000, based on the scope of project. Modest expense budget requests up to $2,500 will be additionally considered. Fellows will be paired with a mentor to serve as a source of guidance for the project, and the cohort will convene in person twice during the course of the Fellowship. PEN America will draw on the Writing for Justice Advisory Committee, as well as its network of agents, editors, publishers, partner organizations and outlets in order to assist efforts for publication and dissemination of the work of the Fellows. Opportunities for sharing the created work through public forums will be organized in New York City at the PEN World Voices Festival, in the Fellow’s home community, and possibly additional locations.


5. GENEVA RESIDENCY
Deadline: May 15th
website: http://www.eofa.ch/en/applications/

Embassy of Foreign Artists (EoFA) is a place of residence for artists in Geneva. Our spaces welcome the different stages of the creative process, from the first gropings and reflections to its presentation in a finished form. EoFA's first vocation is to host artists in residence and to set up a program that promotes interaction with the local public, whether professionals, amateurs or curious. EoFA also organizes wider events where local artists and residents meet around different artistic practices (music, dance, performance, installations, conferences, etc.). Thanks to its many activities and appointments, EoFA has established itself as a place of choice for the discovery of original proposals.

The Republic and Canton of Geneva, in partnership with the association Laps, opened a residence in Maison Baron, located in the heart of the "Praille-Acacias-Vernets" perimeter in 2012. This project called Embassy of Foreign Artists aims to create, through the presence of creators from elsewhere and their exchanges with local artists and cultural organizations, a network of interactions conducive to the development of innovative views and reflections on contemporary urban transformations.

Applications are now open until the 15th of May 2019, at midnight, local time (UTC+2).

The Embassy of Foreign Artists is launching calls for themed projects, open to all types of practice. These reflect our areas of interest and our aim to offer research time and visibility to original projects that examine their subject critically.

The stay provides:

• A private room as well as a working space and access to common areas shared with other residents.

• A residency of three or six months (the desired length of stay must be specified on the Application Questionnaire).

• A grant of 1200.- Swiss francs per month for the length of the stay.


6. FLORIDA THEATRICAL ASSOCIATION: NEW MUSICAL DISCOVERY SERIES
Deadline: May 20th
Website: http://floridatheatrical.org/new-musical-discovery-series

Aspiring writers from around the country are encouraged to submit their new works, which will be reviewed by a panel of theatre professionals, including renowned directors, writers, producers and performers. The panel will select two works that will each receive a staged reading. One final winner will receive a workshop presented of their piece featuring local directors and talent. The Discovery Series will also include talkbacks for students and audiences with the playwrights and directors.

All submissions must include: A cover letter A history of the musical’s development A synopsis Full script A CD or flash drive with at least six songs from the production (can be a very basic recording) *Please note that materials will not be returned.

Electronic Submission can also be emailed to kennyhoward@floridatheatrical.org.


7. MITTEN LAB
Deadline: May 31st
website: https://www.themittenlab.org/

he MITTEN Lab (A Michigan Incubator for Theatre Talent Emerging Now), led by co-founders Katherine M. Carter and Rachel Sussman, is now accepting submissions for the 2019 MITTEN Lab residency, taking place from September 8 - 15, 2019 in Bear Lake, MI and culminating in a presentation featuring Interlochen Arts Academy students and Parallel 45 Theatre company members.

Submissions are now open to all playwrights, musical theatre composers, lyricists, and librettists ages 18 and up. Submissions will be accepted through Friday, May 31, 2019 at 11:59 PM EST. The submission fee is $20 ($15 for students with a valid ID). A reading committee of industry professionals will review all applications. Artists accepted for the residency program will be notified by mid-July. For more information or to apply, please visit http://www.themittenlab.org.

The MITTEN Lab is a nonprofit artist residency program located in Northern Michigan that provides early career theatre artists with the time, space, and support to develop new theatrical works and engage with the local landscape. Artists pay nothing to participate - housing, travel, studio space, meals, and a stipend are provided.


8. JAMES STEVENSON COMEDIC SHORT PLAYS
Deadline: May 31st
website: http://playingonair.org

In his editorial cartoons for The New Yorker, James Stevenson told stories about the human comedy with energy and economy. Playing on Air, a theater podcast and public radio show, will award three major prizes ($7500 with recording for radio and podcast distribution; $2000; $1000) for short comedies that perpetuate Mr. Stevenson's spirit and wit, bringing the finest new American plays to a national audience - for free.

What to Submit:
- Playing on Air invites writers to submit a short comedic play of 10-25 pages (not counting title page).
- All entries must be original, unproduced plays. Scripts may not be adapted from the playwright’s published or previously-produced work.
- Submissions will be judged for literary merit, originality, and regard for the spirit of James Stevenson.
- Please do not include sound design cues or instructions beyond standard stage directions.
- Special consideration will be given to the script’s suitability for audio recording, as well as public radio broadcast.  Single-character monologues and plays that rely on the extensive use of a chorus, cast doubling, stage directions, or visual elements are discouraged.
- No fee is required for entry.


9. BMI WORKSHOP
Deadline: June 1st for librettist
                 August 1st for composers and lyricists
Website: https://www.bmi.com/theatre_workshop/application_requirements

A new prologue to the established Librettists Workshop, Bookwriting Basics explores the fundamentals of writing book for the musical theatre through a series of lectures and assignments. This is a one-year course.

Fall Semester

Award winning bookwriter Adam Mathias unlocks the toolkit for musical theatre librettists. Through lecture, discussion and assignments students learn how to apply the fundamentals of playwriting to the craft of creating musicals.

Spring Semester

David Spencer, award winning bookwriter/lyricist and author of The Musical Theatre Writers’ Survival Guide, leads exploration through a series of masterworks to uncover what makes them work...and through analysis of promising source material for unsuccessful shows that had the potential to work…in which the class endeavors to solve inherent challenges that the original creative teams didn’t.

Librettists Workshop
After completing the Bookwriting Basics program, writers may apply to join the established Librettists Workshop group. Not all writers who apply will be invited to join.

Nancy Golladay, veteran Broadway literary manager and dramaturg, moderates a writers’ roundtable focused on developing the skills unique to musical theatre bookwriters. Members read and critique each other’s work as their material evolves from one-page synopses to fully scripted scenes — including occasional cold readings of an entire show. In a yearly collaborative project, the Librettists Workshop engages with the First Year Songwriting Class. Librettist Workshop members are also eligible to participate in Collaborator Connections events with members of the Songwriters Workshops.


10. LUXEMBOURG ARTS PRIZE
Deadline: June 2nd
website: https://www.luxembourgartprize.com/en/call-for-submissions-en/

The Luxembourg Art Prize aims to reveal and promote talented artists who have yet to establish a profile on the contemporary international scene. Its function is to discover artists, and it is open to any artist, amateur or professional, with no limits on age, nationality or place of residence. The Prize is aimed at artists working in one or more of the following media: drawing, printing, installation, painting, performance, photography, digital art, sculpture, sound art, video, mixed media, decorative art (textiles and material, glass, wood, metal, ceramics, mosaic, paper or other techniques).

The winner of the Prize receives an award of €50'000 (about US$56,500 GBP42,500 CHF56,000 CA$75,000 JPY6,300,000) paid into their bank account within a few days of the ceremony. The finalist artists will be included in a group exhibition in the gallery. The Luxembourg Art Prize is a unique opportunity to enter the international professional art circuit and to have your work seen by major private and institutional art collectors. You will have the chance to be supported and personally advised by Hervé Lancelin.

Unlike other prizes or art salons, the Luxembourg Art Prize is designed by a leading not-for-profit organisation to boost your career by exhibiting your work in a private exhibition space of museum quality and giving you a high level of visibility.

All the costs associated with travel to and accommodation in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg for the finalist artists and one other person of their choice will be paid in full by the organisation in 2019. This includes transport for the works of art, air and train tickets and full-board accommodation in a four-star hotel.

The organisation will arrange return travel for the finalist artists and their companions by train or air. It will send travel documents to the finalist artists and their companions within the ten days before the opening of the finalist artists’ group exhibition.

The organisation will also book hotel rooms on the basis of dual occupancy (each artist with their companion).


11. THE RELENTLESS AWARD
Deadline: June 15th
Website: http://www.americanplaywritingfoundation.org/the-relentless-award.html

 WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR:

Plays that are challenging.
Plays that exhibit fearlessness.
Plays that are not mainstream.
Plays that exude passion.
Plays that are relentlessly truthful.
The American Playwriting Foundation encourages submissions by first-time playwrights, women and playwrights of color.

PRIZE:

The author of the Relentless Award-winning play will receive $45,000.
The winning playwright will have the option to have the winning play published by the Dramatists Play Service.
The winning playwright will have a week-long residency at SPACE on Ryder Farm, an artist residency program housed on a working organic farm in Brewster, New York. The author can elect to have a director, a dramaturg and actors join him or her while in residence on the farm.
The selected play will have a national roll-out through the Ed Vassallo Relentless Reading Series, established to help bring to life and develop the winning play by presenting a series of staged readings at some of the top theaters across the United States.
When the winning play is selected, three runners-up will also be named.

Monday, April 29, 2019

Meeting John Singleton

I met John Singleton on my first trip to NYC. I went as the Northwestern representative for Nibblebox, a new internet entertainment company that was trying to harness the creative power of college students to create funny content. I saw the Nibblebox flyer by the Norris Center cafeteria elevator. I thought 'what an awful name' but then I noticed that the company promised lots of swag, free airplane tixs, and a trip to NYC for anyone who wanted to be a campus rep. YOINK! I snatched that flyer off the wall and ran back to my dorm. A free trip to NYC to talk about internet content for a company that sounds like a cross between a porno studio and a cat supply store? NIBBLEBOX!!

I went with Ron Holsey, who I deputized as a vital associate so he could get a free plane tix too. We were put up in a hotel by the United Nations and we used the scary nyc subway to get to the conference where we spent the next few days muttering 'that's so Nibblebox" under our breath every time someone said something that was on brand with either a sexual innuendo or pet supplies. Singleton was the keynote speaker. He was warm and friendly. He seemed to be as confused by Nibblebox as we were. WTF were we doing here, we said to each other with our smizing eyes. I asked Singleton about his upcoming movie SHAFT. His tight-lipped answer suggested that he was not too thrilled with the SHAFT shoot, but he offered me kindness and grace as we were apart of the few black men in a sea of caucasity. Nibblebox!

One of the female Nibblebox execs kept making creepy passes at Ron while wandered around after my meeting with Singleton. I wish I had cornered him and asked for a job, or asked him something more poignant, but this felt like neither the time or place for a discussion about racial dynamics in the entertainment industry. I blew my chance or gave away my shoot. I was in the room where it happened but I...you get the point. Nibblebox.

All these years later, I still remembered a graceful man handling a lot of pressure, being one of the only black directors in Hollywood making it, and trying to find the time to talk to students about stupid frat videos. Some times kindness doesn't come in great acts. Some times it comes in tiny, seemingly mundane moments, in awkward silences, or just a warm knowing look that said 'brother, how the fuck did we end up in here?' NIBBLEBOX!

Thank you Mr. Singleton. I may not have conquered NYC on my first visit, but I certainly partook of your insight, charm, and grace.

Rest in Power.

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Sunday Brunch Thoughts on Legacy


I woke up this morning to the irresistible smell of a Sunday brunch being cooked upstairs. My stomach rumbled. I was going to have a breakfast shake but that damn brunch smell permeated the apt hallways. it seeped through my door. I couldn't take it. I ran out of my apartment to get an egg sandwich on a biscuit. In the throes of my cravings, I forgot my keys. Locked out. Not going to make it the gym in time for yoga. I sat on the stoop and looked around. I ate my sandwich and drank kombucha. I watched a father rolling his son down the street on a bike. I thought about the connection between father and son. That's some legacy 'ish.' The scene was like out of a Norman Rockwell painting about family and generations. My mind drifted. After about 20 minutes, a neighbor came back from a morning walk. He let me in and I was back in my apartment. I got back to writing, but the silent sitting had shifted something or opened up my mind. My head started buzzing with random questions...

-is it unusual that there's this sonic boom for Black playwrights but not for Black theatre institutions?

- Maybe it's irrelevant. Maybe a theatremakers true legacy is just the written word.

-In TV, a successful writer ends up having their own show, creating their own company, hiring execs, and getting development deals. They eventually own the means of production (and maybe even distribution down the line) Black moguls like Oprah, Shonda Rhimes, Tyler Perry, Lee Daniels, and Jordan Peele don't just create new stories. They package, produce, market. They build empires that employ others and control...and it all started with the written word. Isn't this a better legacy?

- Imagine if Dick Wolf was a really great playwright. He would have a lot of plays. His plays would get produced by other people, in other cities. The control would be minimal.

- Say what you will about him, David Mamet has a connection to Atlantic Theatre Company. Is that legacy building?

- But is money/power a real legacy? Maybe theatre stays true to the real thing, the only thing that carries over: the written word.

- Or is that 'written word' legacy just romantic bullshit to keep artists from controlling their own shows?

- Maybe a lot of black theatre institutions from the 1960s and 1970s became incestuous and backward? I know very few Black writers from Yale, Juilliard, Brown or any of the elite schools who are being hit up by the Black Theatre conference in NC. Negro Ensemble Company helped create Pulitzer-prize winning plays.

- is the theatre grind so hard, that writers don't think about getting together to own the means of production? When you're on the rise, your main obsession is the next commission and next production, getting connected to the bigger org, the director with more power. Often this leads to tribes of nomadic artists that mingle together for a few months for production and then wander off to the next show.

- The nomads were eventually destroyed by the farmers who built homes. Is the same fate true for artists? Or is the home only what you carry in a script?

- if August Wilson was alive today, would he be running a TV room? Would he have his own prestige empire of tv dramas? Is that hopeful or sad? Would we have gotten the decalogue?

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Williamsburg Bar Conversations

Williamsburg Bar Conversations: the bartender handed me my dinner bill and asked me if I'm a PI b/c of my card. No, that is my S-Corp. "I Prefer Pi" is a palindrome that I like. The guy sitting next to me asked if he should get an S-corp b/c he has a salmon fishing business...in Alaska. He flies out there with a partner, catches a ton of fresh salmon on a boat, sells it on the docks, and then brings back about 50 lbs of salmon in a cooler to hand out to friends in Brooklyn. Okay, that is specific.

I asked him what he does in Brooklyn and he said he's a fireman. His firehouse had a busy week. A mother dropped off a newborn baby. That's interesting because I worked on a show where that is a plot point in the pilot. The fireman said it was the first time he's experienced that, but they sat the mother down, made her breakfast and coffee. She explained that she couldn't take care of the child. The fireman debated whether or not to keep the child in the firehouse or send him home with one of the married men. I said...hmmm, that's funny b/c that was in the show I worked on. THIS IS US? He stared at me. No? Never heard of... okay, go on with your story.

The fireman said that they were seriously considering adopting the kid and then they realized that would be ridiculous so they gave him up to the police. And now they're all wondering what's going to become of the kid. Maybe they made a mistake. Foster care isn't easy. So he wandered over to this Williamsburg bar to drink while I ate a very unsatisfying iceberg lettuce taco salad. But the conversation was worth the meal. 

Monday, April 22, 2019

Impeachment Math for Dems


REASONS TO IMPEACH

- two dozen federal crimes committed by Trump. Obstruction of justice charges (there are freaking 10 of them), the illegal Stormy Daniels payments, his corrupt inauguration fund that was used illegally, Cohen blackmailing corporations on Trump's behalf.

-to get his tax returns.

-access the full unredacted report as evidence.

- protect the Constitution.

- bring in Comey, Flynn, Cohen, Gates as witnesses. 3 out of 4 of these people are going to prison.

- get Sally Yates and Preet Bharara to testify.

 you can just play the Lester Holt interview in which he publically admits to tampering with the investigation and firing Comey.

- just read the F***ing NYTimes article which outlines 30 yrs or rampant crimes, systemic tax fraud, lying, cheating and stealing. It just won the Pulitzer Prize. Read it!

REASONS NOT TO IMPEACH

- Fox News viewers might get really angry at Dems.

DEM CONCLUSION

 Hmmm, it's tricky. We don't want to do anything too popular. It might energize our base which makes all of us feel like icky. It might put us in a difficult situation of representing people's wishes and upholding the law, aka being a radical liberal. 

Porn Ages into Art

Misogyny or adult classics? Rapper Luther Campbell (aka Uncle Luke aka Mr. Freak Nasty) was the marshal of a parade down in Miami. He jokingly yelled out 'FACE DOWN' and all the adults over 30 started laughing. The kids were confused. But ppl who grew up in Miami in the 1980s knew he was referring to the call-and-response chorus in his song...

-face down
-ass up
-that's the way we like to....*ahem*

At the time of the song, it was considered truly shocking and disgusting. So all the kids immediately learned the lyrics and would rap them behind their parent's back. In the parade, 20 yrs later the kids have grown into adults and we were laughing at the quaintness of a song...or maybe how it reminded us of our rebellious youth. A few yrs after 2 Live Crew's glory days, Lil Kim's opening salvo in her "Hardcore" album was...

- I used to be scared of the ****
-Now I throw lips to the shit
- Handle it, like a real ***

And then Khia topped her years later with "My Neck, My Back, Lick My..."

Is there a certain point when everything sexually shocking becomes nostalgic? The jazz song "All That Meat and No Potatoes" is about being unsatisfied with a woman's chest. If you take in the words, it's offensive. But now it's considered an American songbook standard.

Is there a point when "Facedown" or "My Neck, My Back" or Lil Kim will be performed in Lincoln Center with a luscious orchestra arrangement...like a lot of the jazz and rock classics? Is it a losing battle to condemn anything because kids will consume it even more when it's 'naughty' and then grow up to have warm and fuzzy feelings about their dad's porn stash or x-rated music? 

Sunday, April 21, 2019

The Love of More

There is a woman who begs in my neighborhood. She approached me today on Easter Sunday with her usual routine. She looks and acts like a drug addict: fidgety, spastic, dirty clothes, bad breath. She gets up in people's faces, follows them, says she needs money for tampons. If you give her money for that then it's a sandwich. If she gets that, then it's just $40 to stay at a house for the night. I give until I am comfortable, usually, it's most of the money in my wallet which may be anywhere from $2 to $20. No matter the amount, she asks for more. More more more. I understand her desire for more.

There is a writer friend who asks for help constantly. I give this person help and they ask for rewrites, some times they jokingly ask if I can write for them. They are stuck. My career advances and they cling on as if I can give them some magic potion. Other writers ask for more help: how can I get a TV job, how can I get an agent? I started up a writers' group that now has over 70 ppl because ppl ask for more time, more help. I understand their desire for more.

There is a voice in my head that asks for more time. To meditate and pray. To cut off the outside world and dissolve into silence. More more. Never enough of myself. The voice wants more of me.

More used to exhaust me. More used to exasperate me. I used to see it as this bottomless abyss that kept trying to suck me in. I got angry at 'more.' You want more? I would fold my arms and scream 'you get nothing now!' It took me a while to realize that the 'more' was love. In substitution of that, the voices/people ask for things: labor, money, time. But these things are not substantial enough so the need increases. More drugs, more sex, more money, more fame, more 'likes,' more more more. One drop of love can fill a galaxy, but a universe of stuff can't fill that tiny 'more.'

I set limits on the physical 'more.' Not to be selfish but because I realize the real thing they want is limitless love. And as long as we stay stuck on the finite thing, we will never get to the infinite. I only learned this from the pleading voices and begging hands of this world, so I guess they are there for me as a lesson.

Happy Easter.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

WGA/ATA: A Play

Writers: We aren't happy.
Agencies: Well I don't think so. And brah: you look fantastic!
Writers: No, we are telling you that we are not happy. So what are you going to do?
Agencies: Can I get you some bottled water?
Writers: Sparkling?
Agencies: Piss infused.
Writers: Pass. You are ripping us off and here are the receipts.
Agencies: Our math says that you is kind, you is important, um-
Writers: 95% of us are not happy.
Agencies: But Jon Robin Batiz is friends with his agent. Did you read his letter? Soulful, tender, it was like "Old Yeller." We wept.
Writers: We are not happy so...you are fired.
Agencies: You can't fire us.
Writers: Why not?
Agencies: Because. There would be chaos. Chaos! Chaos! CHAOS!!!! The sky will bleed, horses will eat themselves, there will be anarchy loosened upon the farmer's market. Locusts will consume spec scripts.
Writers: we can actually just talk to ourselves, save the 10%, and cut you out of the process entirely.
Agencies: ILLEGAL!! THAT IS ILLEGAL COMMUNIST CHAOS! When did you become such awful monsters?
Writers: You have systemically ripped off writers, you are double-dealing to yourselves, and you lie.
Agencies: Are you sure I can't get you some Jon Robin Baitz water?
Writers: What's that?
Agencies: The piss infused one.

Friday, April 19, 2019

Successful Black Women

I'm watching jazz documentary about Bessie Smith sending a whole group of KKK klansmen running by marching out of her tent. There is an enormous strength in black women. I'm also aware that being a successful black woman seems to bring out the 'ain't shit' nigga patrol. Wendy Williams, JHud, MJB, Mo'Nique, and countless black businesswomen and entertainers who are strong in the face of so much, and then get ripped off by their own husbands because 'well, they're strong. They can take it.' But strength doesn't mean being indomitable, impervious, and invincible. True strength is layered, complex, feminine/masculine, hard and soft, filled with heroic moments as well as quiet soft times. Does the external strength make good men scared to approach them? Do glitz and success attract the jackals? No wonder Oprah never got married. She was in "Color Purple" and was probably thinking "I already acted in that. I don't need to live it." #youtoldharpotobeatme #nahimgood

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

The Future is the Black Now

Blacks ppl are the canary in the mine/crystal ball of America. We tell you where things are heading about 2-3 generations before they happen.


Black Person: Drugs are destroying our community because our youth feel helpless and alienated.
Gov: Take responsibility and stop being lazy.
White Person (20 yrs later): Opioid addiction is wiping out towns b/c our youth feel helpless and alienated.
Gov: OMG we need to declare a national emergency and help everyone.


Black Person: Gun violence is crazy and out of control with gangs of angry young men shooting ppl.
Media: I'd like to label these young men 'superpredators' and blame it on your broken homes. Take responsibility for systemic problems you can't control.
White Person (20 yrs later): Gun violence by angry young men is killing our children.
Media: National Emergency! We need to do something about these troubled complex teens.


Black Person: Banks are ripping us off with these loans and destroying the community.
Gov: Well you just need to be smarter. Take responsibility!
White Person (2008): These subprime mortgages and shady loans just destroyed the economy.
Gov: Quick: here's an all hands on deck plan, and $800 billion in a suitcase. National Emergency!


Black person: Police have become an insanely violent military force killing unarmed people.
Gov: Well you need to just follow the rules harder. Absolute obedience and everything should be fine.
White Person: The SWAT team just busted down my door and almost killed me over a parking ticket.
Gov: Maybe handing the cops surface-to-air missiles was a bit too much power.


Black Person: Hey look I just did this thing with my mouth and created this beat. Like I'm beating a box.
Media: Sounds stupid and primitive.
Justin Timberlake (30 damn yrs later): Hey guys: check this out.
Media: Here's all the awards!!

Sunday, April 7, 2019

Real Estate

Open house for a 3 bedroom apt...that was really a big one-bedroom chopped up into tiny pods that could barely fit a twin bed. Sigh. The elevator opened up into the apt. You could tell this used to be a gem, but now it is an expensive dorm quad with a shared kitchen. One of the prospective renters quickly left. The rest of us humored the realtor for luring us with not-quite-accurate pictures. Oh well. I walked over to a pub for tacos. The guy who left early was sitting at the bar. He said the apt we just saw made him actively depressed. We started talking while eating.

He's a Turkish computer programmer paying $4k/month. He assured me that it was a nice apt. I laughed. It better be. Programmer said he has seen so many great apts chopped up and turned into joyless pods for maximum occupancy. But he assured me that NYC is not as bad as where he just moved from: San Francisco. He said he was paying the same price for a small room and would step outside onto syringes and bottle shards. Tourist stabbings would happen on his block. The programmer said that the homeless hated him. He was the gentrifier and he hated the area but he needed to live there for work. Neither side was thinking about the fact that they were getting screwed by greedy landlords. He was in this country eeking out a living writing code so he could have his bed in a postage-stamp sized apt while the homeless were the former tenants kicked to the curb. He said NYC was a lot nicer. Williamsburg had more trees and fewer stabbings than other places. I said maybe that should be listed in the amenities section next to exposed brick and central AC.

I gave him the listing of an apt I walked by earlier in the day. The price was too rich for me, but not for the non-stabbing apt budget of a programmer. 

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

GET WHAT YOU WANT: APRIL 2019


1.HALCYON LAB
Deadline: April 4th
Website: https://halcyonhouse.org/arts-lab/apply

At the intersection of art and social change, this nine-month residential fellowship is designed to provide support and resources to emerging artists working on projects which address issues of social justice, civic engagement, and community building. Arts Lab fellows strive to hone their practices and grow as leaders in their respective fields.

Are you a digital artist interested in exhibiting your art in the 'physical world'? Want to see your art displayed throughout Washington, DC during a major international festival? In partnership with ARTECHOUSE, an innovative art space dedicated to showcasing experiential and tech driven artworks, By the People invites you to submit your digital designs to take part in an augmented reality exhibition 'art' hunt'. Through ARTECHOUSE's uniquely designed app, guests will be emboldened to discover the city searching for artworks with their smart phones on the sides of major landmarks, public spaces, and buildings.


2.2020 ATELIER MONDIAL RESIDENCY FOR NYC ARTISTS
Deadline: April 7th
Website: www.residencyunlimited.org/2020-atelier-mondial-residency-for-new-york-city-artists/

RU is proud to announce its sixth open call for New York City-based artists for a 6 month residency at the Atelier Mondial (formerly International Studio and Exchange Program of the Basel Region - iaab) in Basel, Switzerland. This is an exchange program wherein RU hosts a Swiss-based artist in New York City during the same period. The residency program is generously supported by the Zaeslin-Bustany Scholarship.

CONDITIONS

The Atelier Mondial offers a 850 square foot working and living space from January 1 to June 30, 2020, an allowance of $1,200 per month while in Switzerland to cover day to day living costs and a roundtrip flight Switzerland <-> New York. The artist will also receive a 'reduced tarif' public transport card for all public transportation in Switzerland.

RESIDENCY FEATURES

In 2014 the Atelier Mondial facilities were been relocated to a newly constructed building complex at Freilager-Platz at Dreispitz, an emerging art zone just behind the Swiss railway station. Located very close to the Schaulager and the Helsinki building – by the architects Herzog & de Meuron – and directly vis-à-vis the new Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK FHNW ), the Atelier Mondial studios, along with a number of new ‘off’ or alternative spaces and galleries, are now part of the growing Campus of the Arts. The House of Electronic Arts Basel (HeK) is located on the ground floor of the new Atelier Mondial complex at Freilager-Platz 10, where guest artists from around the world will be staying on the first floor.

Basel is a major Swiss cultural and industrial city in the tri-border area where Switzerland, Germany and France meet. It has a rich cultural heritage (e.g., such famous inhabitants include Erasmus, Holbein, Böcklin, Burckhardt, Nietzsche, etc.), ongoing traditions and vital and diverse range of cultural activities (e.g., theater, music, dance, film, etc.) Many of its museums (e.g., Kunstmuseum Basel /Museum of Contemporary Art, Schaulager, Kunsthalle Basel , Fondation Beyeler, Museum der Kulturen, Tinguely Museum, Antikenmuseum Basel and Sammlung Ludwig, etc.), as well as its contemporary architecture , are renowned worldwide. A lively alternative cultural scene complements the prominent public and private institutions.


3. ALPINE FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: April 10th
website: https://alpinefellowship.com/apply

The Alpine Fellowship is a group of writers, thinkers and artists who are passionate about learning and communicating with a view to better understanding themselves and others. We value a capacity for openness - being engaged in critically reflecting on firmly held beliefs; the courage to be vulnerable - speaking from a place of lived experience; the drive for curiosity - being truly able to receive and listen to others.

We think it important to support young people today who may have become somewhat disillusioned by the reality of modern day education. We care about discovering what an alternative model of education might look like. Hence the spirit of the enterprise is necessarily open ended, and we welcome and seek the support, contribution and presence of anyone who relates to what we care about.

Aimed at encouraging theatre writers at the start of their careers to explore and challenge philosophical ideas using the dramatic form. The prize will be £3000 plus a rehearsed reading at the Fellowship’s annual Symposium.

Rules: A dialogue sample of at least 10 pages (a previous play is fine) and a brief proposal of the writer’s intended treatment of the year’s theme of ‘Identity’ (2 pages max, a single paragraph is fine). The Prize is open to anyone above 18 years of age.

The Winner will be expected to deliver a completed script by May 31st, allowing for casting and rehearsals prior to the reading in Sweden.
 Shortlisted entries will be notified by email. Young playwright Jessica Swale will judge the submissions and direct the winning entry’s reading.

4. ACADEMY NICHOLL SCREENWRITING FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: April 10th (normal deadline), May 1st (late deadline with larger fee)
Website: http://www.oscars.org/nicholl/about

Each year, the Academy Nicholl screenwriting competition awards up to five $35,000 fellowships to amateur screenwriters. To enter, submit a feature-length screenplay and entry fee via the online application when the competition is open for submissions. Fellowship winners are invited to participate in awards week ceremonies and seminars and expected to complete at least one original feature film screenplay during the Fellowship year.

QUALIFICATIONS
Screenwriters who have not earned more than $25,000 writing fictional work for film or television.

Entry scripts must be the original work of one writer, or of two writers who collaborated equally, and must be written originally in English. Adaptations and translated scripts are not eligible.

NEW FOR 2017: Full-time students at an accredited college/university are eligible for a discount on their entry fee in 2017. Indicate your status in the demographic section of your online application. The discount will be offered in the payment section.

PRIZES
Up to five $35,000 fellowships are awarded each year to promising new screenwriters. From the program’s inception in 1986, $4.090 million has been awarded to 160 writers.

FELLOWSHIP OBLIGATIONS
Up to five fellows in the Academy Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting competition will be invited to participate in awards week ceremonies and seminars in November.

Fellowship recipients will be expected to complete at least one original feature film screenplay during the fellowship year.

Fellowship payments will be made quarterly subject to satisfactory progress of the recipient’s work, as judged by the Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee.

The Academy reserves the right to grant no awards if, in the opinion of the Academy Nicholl Fellowships Committee, no entry is of sufficient merit.


5. DR. FLOYD GAFFNEY PLAYWRITING CONTEST
Deadline: April 12th
Website: http://www-theatre.ucsd.edu/playwritingcontest/index.htm

The UC San Diego’s Department of Theatre and Dance seeks from all enrolled undergraduate students submissions of previously unproduced, unpublished scripts highlighting the African-American experience in contemporary or historical terms. Adaptations from books and other forms are not allowed.

Click here to download a PDF of the contest flyer

Prize: A $1000 honorarium will be awarded to the winning playwright.

-A staged reading of the winning script  in the Wagner New Play Festival attended by national theatre professionals.

-Travel and housing cost to and from UC San Diego to be present for the performance.

Adjudication:

Finalists and the eventual winners will be selected by a team comprised of the faculty and staff of UCSD Department of Theatre and Dance and invited judges from other theatre facilities, the professional theatre, local media or the UCSD student body.

The decision of the team of adjudicators is final. The UCSD Department of Theatre and Dance reserves the right to select no winner.


6. GOOGLE PODCAST CREATOR PROGRAM
Deadline: April 14th
website: https://googlecp.prx.org/

The Google Podcasts creator program seeks to increase the diversity of voices in the industry globally and lower barriers to podcasting. Selected teams will receive seed funding and participate in an intensive training program.

The program is run by PRX, a pioneer in podcast training and education.

What are you looking for?
We are looking for creative, engaged producers who:

Represent a range of geographies, backgrounds, views, voices and styles
Either identify as marginalized in the current podcasting landscape – whether due to race, ethnicity, gender, religion, economic background, sexual orientation, age, physical abilities or some other reason – or intend to reach an audience that self-identifies as marginalized in the podcasting landscape
Have a fresh and compelling podcast idea
Have a sense of the audience they are trying to reach
Have a sense of how their show will sound
Are interested in making their podcasts sustainable in terms of growing revenue and audience
What are you not looking for?
While we are fans of many podcast formats, we believe the following types of shows will not benefit from this type of training:

Does the team represent or intend to reach an audience currently marginalized in the podcasting landscape (see “what are you looking for” section)?
Does this podcast idea demonstrate creativity and originality?
Does this podcast offer insight into broader issues or the human condition?
Does the team have a clear sense of the audience it wants to reach with the podcast, including why the audience has a need for the podcast?
Does the team seem curious, authentic, flexible and honest?
Does the team have a particularly interesting expertise or take on this idea?
Is the team able to dedicate the time necessary to complete the 20-week training?
Does the team seem to understand the time commitment necessary beyond the training to make a successful podcast?
Does the team have rights to tell the stories in the podcast or a plan to obtain them?
Regarding intellectual property, are there any strings attached for PRX and Google supporting these podcasts?
PRX and Google do not assume any rights to your intellectual property in this process, even at the application stage. You alone own your idea. PRX will ask each selected team to sign a letter of agreement covering payment terms, services and program expectations.

Can I apply again if I applied the first time?
Yes. Please highlight the work you have done since the first application and let us know about any new developments with your project.

If I applied the first time, is there a way I can edit my original application?
You can log into your Submittable account to view your original application (more info on how to do so here). However, you will need to start a new application for this round.

Can I apply even it's just me?
Yes, you can apply as a solo producer.

How many people should my team plan to send?
Maximum 3 people per team.


7. NEW VOICES FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: April 15th
Website: https://www.larktheatre.org/get-involved/submit-play/

The New Voices Fellowship supports playwrights of color under 30 who demonstrate financial need. During a year-long residency, Fellows will work on multiple artistic projects through an individually-tailored program of Lark play development programs, and form relationships with other theater-makers at various career stages from all parts of the world. Fellowship includes a cash award of $15,000, plus an Opportunity Fund of $3,000 for the purposes of travel, research, autonomous workshops, or other work-related expenses, along with access to a wide range of Lark resources, including artistic program participation, office and rehearsal space, and staff support.


8. P73 FELLOWSHIP & INTERSTATE
Deadline: April 15th
Website: https://www.page73.org/application

The Page 73 Playwriting Fellowship provides a year of comprehensive support to one early-career playwright who has not received a professional production in New York City (please see eligibility requirements below). Through this program, Page 73 provides artistic and financial resources to this writer as they develop one or more new plays of their choosing. The Page 73 Playwriting Fellow receives an unrestricted award of $10,000 and a development budget, managed by Page 73 and the Fellow over the course of the Fellowship year, up to an additional $10,000.

The Fellow is encouraged to think creatively about using Fellowship resources to meet concrete goals that might not otherwise be possible. These goals may include, but are not limited to, development of one or more new plays, assistance in building relationships within the New York City theater community, research, and/or travel. Please note that funds from the Page 73 Playwriting Fellowship do not cover full-scale productions, nor does Page 73 commit to producing the work of the Fellow. The Fellowship incorporates at least one public presentation by the Fellow. Page 73 also helps the Fellow identify and connect with collaborators, including directors, designers, actors and dramaturgs, for Fellowship projects.

The Fellow is associated with Page 73 for the calendar year, from January 1 to December 31. After being selected, they work with Page 73’s staff to develop a plan for the year and establish a timeline for the development work to be done on the new play or plays. The Fellow may also be invited to participate in the Page 73 Summer Residency and, if eligible, Interstate 73 (described below) during the Fellowship year.

If the Fellow is not a New York City resident, they must be prepared to travel to New York during the Fellowship year in order to fully engage in the opportunities that the Fellowship provides.

INTERSTATE: Interstate 73 is Page 73’s yearlong writers group. Consisting of six to eight playwrights and led by Page 73’s Producing Artistic Director and Artistic Associate, Interstate 73 meets twice monthly on weeknight evenings at our office in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Each playwright receives a stipend for participating. Participants bring in pages that are read aloud and discussed by the group. Each participating playwright is also given an opportunity for a reading of a completed work, which can be public or private, depending on the playwright’s interests and needs. Page 73's staff works with each playwright to craft the reading to be as useful as possible for the writer.

Interstate 73 begins each year in January, and meetings run through December; sessions are typically suspended for a period in the summer. Please consult the eligibility requirements below. Page 73 selects participants from individuals we meet through this application process as well as from individuals who have become known to the company through other means.


10. BOGLIASCO FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: April 15th
Website: ttp://www.bfny.org

The Bogliasco Foundation is pleased to announce a new residential Fellowship for an American scholar in European art history. The five-week Fellowship, which will take place at the Foundation’s Study Center near Genoa during the Spring 2020 semester, includes full room and board and a travel stipend of $1000. The Fellowship is open to American art historians of all ages who are working on pre-modern projects (antiquity to early 19th century), and who are not currently in a degree-granting program.

For complete instructions and eligibility details, kindly consult the Foundation’s online application site at http://www.bfny.org/en/apply. The deadline to apply is April 15th.


11. A STUDIO IN THE WOODS: ADAPTATION RESIDENCY
Deadline: April 22nd
Website: http://www.astudiointhewoods.org/apply-for-adaptations-living-with-change/

New Orleans and the region are frequently invoked as one of the areas most vulnerable to the effects of environmental change. Our highly manipulated landscape can be seen as a microcosm of the global environment, manifesting both the challenges and possibilities inherent in the ways humans interact with urban and natural ecosystems. With nearly half of the world’s population living within 40 miles of a coastline with rising seas, the concerns of Southern Louisiana resonate globally. Adaptations Residencies invite artists to examine how climate-driven adaptations – large and small, historic and contemporary, cultural and scientific – shape our future. Adaptations Residencies will provide artists with time, space, scholarship and staff support to foster critical thinking and creation of new works. The call is open to artists of all disciplines who have demonstrated an established dialogue with environmental and culturally related issues and a commitment to seeking and plumbing new depths. We ask artists to describe in detail how the region will affect their work, to propose a public component to their residency and to suggest ways in which they will engage with the local community. Direct questions to Cammie Hill-Prewitt at info@astudiointhewoods.org

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS
Proposals are due April 22nd and residencies will be awarded by June 14th, 2019.

DATES
Residencies are 6 weeks and will take place between September 2019 and May 2020. Flexibility in your dates is appreciated as we try to accommodate everyone’s schedules.

ARTIST ELIGIBILITY
Visual, musician/composing, performance, literary, new media, and interdisciplinary artists are eligible to apply. Both established and emerging artists may apply, but a rigorous work ethic and demonstrated commitment to public engagement are expected.  Artists of color are encouraged to apply and we are particularly interested in receiving applications from indigenous artists. Students are not eligible. Collaborative teams of up to two artists can be in residence, please contact info@astudiointhewoods.org for instructions on how to apply as a collaborative team.

SELECTION PROCESS
A multidisciplinary jury will judge proposals on the following criteria:

The creativeness and integrity of the proposal
Demonstrated ability to collaborate with colleagues and wider audiences
The proposal’s public component and its depth of engagement with the community

SUPPORT
Recipients will be provided $2500 as a stipend and $2000 towards materials. Artists will also have the opportunity to work with an external evaluator/ally. Depending on the needs of the project, we may be able to assist artists in accessing Tulane University faculty consultants or research collections. ASITW provides full room and board including food, utilities for living and studio space to selected residents. Residents are expected to cover personal living expenses, additional materials and supplies, and any other expenses relating to the cost of producing work incurred while in the program. Travel and shipping expenses to and from ASITW for the residency are also the responsibility of the artist.


12. GEFFEN PLAYHOUSE WRITERS' ROOM
deadline: April 22nd
website: http://www.geffenplayhouse.org/thewritersroom

A group for Los Angeles-based playwrights, The Writers’ Room is a product of the Geffen’s deep commitment to supporting new plays and specifically to fostering bold, relevant work by the vibrant artistic community of this city. During a one-year residency, playwright members gather monthly at the Geffen to share their work and receive feedback from their peers in a forum facilitated by Rachel Wiegardt-Egel, the Geffen’s Manager of New Play Development. With applications that are open to all Los Angeles-based playwrights, this program is ideal for those who would benefit from a structured and supportive environment in which to work on a new play. In addition to the feedback of their fellow writers, members receive dramaturgical support from the theater’s artistic staff, a ticket to all Gil Cates Theater shows at the Geffen for the season in which their residency takes place, and the opportunity to further develop their work with a director and actors in a culminating reading that may be open to the public.

We invite local playwrights to apply with ambitious new projects. In order to apply, please send a one-page project proposal and a 20 page writing sample (from a previous full-length play) to thewritersroom@geffenplayhouse.org. The project proposal should include: your name, your email address, your phone number, your permanent address (including zip code), and the title of your writing sample, as well as a description of the plot and style of the play you’d like to work on during this one-year residency and why you would benefit from taking part in The Writers’ Room program. Please send both the proposal and writing sample as PDFs.

The Writers’ Room group will meet once a month on Monday nights from September 2019 through July 2020. (There will also be two months over the course of the year when the group will meet twice, for a total of 13 meetings.) Readings of each play will take place in summer 2020. While we understand that conflicts can be unpredictable, please do not apply if you know you will be unavailable on Mondays generally or will be out of town for an extended period of time that will cause you to miss more than two of the monthly meetings. If you are unsure whether your conflicts will prohibit you from participating, please note this in your proposal. Once the group has been selected, conflicts will be taken into consideration to pick dates that work for everyone.

The Writers’ Room is made possible through the generous support of Patricia Kiernan Applegate.

Application deadline: 11:59 p.m. PST on Monday, April 22, 2019
Interviews of finalist applicants: mid-late July 2019
Notification of program acceptance: mid-late July 2019
Program start date: September 2019
Program end date: end of August 2020


13. CARLO ANNONI PRIZE
Deadline: April 30th
Website: http://premiocarloannoni.eu


The Carlo Annoni Award is for theatre plays on gay themes and on diversity in love. The plays can be written in Italian or in English. The prize is € 1000 for texts for each language (Italian and English).

Plays must be sent by April 30, 2019 to: info@premiocarloannoni.eu

Participation is free of charge. Texts already represented in the previous two years will also be taken into consideration.

The award ceremony will take place in September 2019 with an event in Milan.

A “library” of plays received is being created on this site to make them available to theater companies: those who want their text to become part of the virtual library must express their consent at the time of submitting the play, provided that the Author has all rights.


14. CBS WRITERS’ MENTORING (LA-based)
Deadline: May 1st
Website: https://www.cbscorporation.com/diversity/diversity-institute/writers-mentoring-program/

The focus of this eight month program is on opening doors: providing opportunities to build relationships with network executives and show runners; to support new and emerging writers in their efforts to improve their craft; and to develop the interpersonal skills necessary to break in and succeed. The Writers Mentoring Program is not employment and there is no monetary compensation. It is, instead, a structured program of career development, support, and personal access to executives and the decision-making processes, with the goal of preparing aspiring writers for later employment opportunities in television. Each participant will be teamed with an executive mentor.

A CBS network or studio executive with whom they will meet on a regular basis, to discuss their work, get creative feedback on their material and get advice and support in furthering their career.

Once a week, participants will be invited to attend a small workshop-style meeting with various CBS show runners and other industry professionals. Speakers include executive producers, agents, managers, development and current executives and show runners. The purpose of these gatherings is for participants to gain a better understanding of how the business works from many different perspectives as well as creating the opportunity to make critical networking connections. Another important part of the program is the opportunity for each participant to spend time observing in a writers room, as well as in the CBS current and/or development departments. Each participant will have help in creating a rigorous career action plan and there will be on-going support in evaluating and achieving those goals. Another important benefit of the program is the development of a close-knit peer support group that will sustain participants through the program and beyond. The CBS Writers Mentoring Program helps aspiring writers to understand the unwritten rules of breaking in and moving up. It is a combination of mentoring and networking opportunities. Program opportunities such as mentoring, workshops, and observing can be scheduled around participants’ existing work commitments. In order for a participant to get the most out of the Program a meaningful commitment of time and effort are required. It has been found that in order to derive the greatest benefit from the program, participants should be available to 1) attend a once a week (evening) workshop and 2) attend meetings or observe in various situations for a minimum of five full days (not necessarily in sequence) over the course of the eight-month program.

Eligibility
The primary focus of the CBS Writers Mentoring Program is to provide access and opportunities for talented and motivated diverse writers. Aspiring diverse writers with a strong desire to write for CBS television series are encouraged to apply. You must be 21 or older to be eligible. All completed application materials must be received between March 1, 2019 and May 1, 2019. Any submissions received before March 1st or after May 1st, 2019 will not be considered. No hand delivered submissions will be accepted. Finalists will be notified in mid September 2019 (or such later date as may be determined by CBS). The program is scheduled to begin in October 2019 and continues through April 2020. CBS reserves the right to make adjustments to program schedule as necessary.


15. NATIONAL BLACK THEATER: I AM SOUL RESIDENCY
deadline: May 1st
website: https://www.nationalblacktheatre.org/

Launched in 2012, I AM SOUL - Playwright Residency Program is the only program in the country that is dedicated to Black playwrights, whose work demonstrates exceptional artistic merit and excellence in the theatrical field, with a commitment to a production. Coined as a dream MFA program, this residency also seeks to unleash the soul of a playwright on the page so that they can develop, hone and explore new ways of artistic expression in a safe, supported and transformative environment. 

Alongside NBT’s Artistic  Director, the selected playwright (s) will develop a new play during the eighteen (18) month residency. The program provides the playwright with a stipend, administrative and dramaturgical support, in-house readings, and two 29-hour workshops. This process culminates with a Workshop Production in NBT’s following season.

With I AM SOUL, NBT seeks to deepen the artistic relationship between Black theatrical institutions and Black playwrights in order to re-establish Black theatrical institutions as the foremost supporters and producers of new works created by Black playwrights. 

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

WHACK-A -2020 CANDIDATE


Rules
- beg someone to run in 2020
- wait until person announces they are running and then...
- talk shit about them running.
- get them to quit running.
- then ask 'why you quitting?'
- fix candidate a plate to take home (no mac n' cheese. Mac n' cheese is for closers.)

THEM: Elizabeth Warren was the one who should've run 2016. She speaks truth to power.
WARREN: Okay, I'm in.
THEM: Are you 'in' a time machine, heifer? It's 2019. I said 2016. I'm done wicchu.

THEM: God, imagine how great it would be if Beto ran.
BETO: Okay, I'm gonna run.
THEM: Fake ass motherfucker. He think he cute. Ugh, why you standing on ppl's tables like you ain't got no sense?

THEM: If only someone was strong and moderate like Kamala Harris?
KAMALA: Okay, I'm gonna do it.
THEM: Are you gonna do it like you did your white husband?!? How about all 'dem black kids you put in prison? You gonna do it like that, you traitor?

THEM: It would be great if we had someone relatable and unpolished like Sherrod Brown.
SHERROD: All right ppl, I'm ready.
THEM: You ready to apply for a QUEER EYE makeover? Wiccha dusty ass jackets.

THEM: I wish there were more Latinos running.
JULIAN CASTRO: Okay, here I am.
THEM: Who? Wait, what just happened? No, I didn't mean you. I meant a fictional Latino. Why are you still here?

Monday, March 25, 2019

Taking the Mueller Bait (and losing the focus)

I think the turning point for me was the end of 2017. I went home for the holidays and I saw that cable news (particularly MSNBC) had been overtaken by the Russia-Russia-Russia question. My inbox started to fill with emails from Dem groups seeking donations by using the Mueller investigation as an outrage point. Any Mueller insult Trump tweeted not only reverberated with his fans, but it vibrated in the Dem echo chamber. A limited-scope investigation was now bait for not only the media but fundraising. Mueller speculations caused this endless glee in both GOP and Dem speakers and it made me feel like I was being played. Mueller was our hope and savior. Mueller was the devil incarnate. Mueller was going to save democracy. Mueller was going to hand the White House to the Dems on a silver platter. It seemed like Dems were surrendering tons of valid anti-Trump arguments and focusing in on just one thing. I still followed the news and was intrigued by Mueller, but it didn't deserve all of my time and energy. House Dem candidates showed that when they just forgot about Mueller and ran on progressive ideas they trounced the Republican party. But progressive ideas are not really what mainstream Dems want to talk about b/c many of the party leaders are bought by corporations. And corporate media doesn't want to talk about progressives ideas b/c its antithetical to its business model. So the Russian probe served as a point of mutual agreement: they had no control over it, it was a silent investigation so endless speculation could abound, and they could fundraise on any Trump tweet.

Don't get me wrong: I think the investigation was important and I followed verified indictments. The process led to over 30 Trump officials being indicted and/or found guilty. It also helped launched dozens of investigations at the federal and state level that will continue. I still want to see the full report and I think AG Barr is shady as hell. But Mueller IS NOT the answer. It was a legal investigation. it wasn't a witch hunt, nor was it the left-wing salvation. I want a Dem party and MSNBC that is not held hostage by this narrow issue. Dems can and do beat the GOP when they talk about issues in clear thematic tones. No middle American voters are being swayed by Russian interference (which they did). They are being swayed by healthcare, unions, gun violence. Yes, the Russian gov and mafia support Trump b/c they have deep financial ties. But guess what: deep financial ties are not collusion. Is it corruption? Hell yes, but it is 100% legal corruption. Our system is compromised by dark money and lobbyist, but it is legal. A prosecutor can't put someone in jail for being a scumbag when American politics rewards the behavior. As AOC said, 90% of the heinous and corrupt stuff in US politics is legal. So maybe run on changing that. But if you do run on cleaning up the system, that means that Dems have to be clean too. In 2020 they have to be a better party than the one that currently exists. They have to embrace progressive issues, talk about campaign corruption, and have leadership (Pelosi and Schumer) willing to change or get out of the way.

2020 is around the corner. I hope everyone gets prosecuted through the SDNY and DC courts...AND I hope Dems run on being the change they want to see.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Death Star: WGA v. ATA

WGA/ATA Negotiations: The major talent agencies are victims of their own success. No one REALLY needs an agent to create work or get a job. 99% of that happens through human relations. Managers and lawyers can make introductions too. In the 1960s and 1970s agents had to be seen as the indispensable 'the middle man' in the creation process b/c they didn't really participate in the making of anything. The top agents in town became powerbrokers on their ability to network, talk, schmooze, and deal. Outsized egos and legends formed. Organizations formed around these 'larger than life' figures. Assistants, junior agents, lawyers, and layers of bureaucracy were added. The agencies became enamored with their own brand and how to market themselves. Bigger buildings, Oscar and Emmy extravaganzas, Babylonian largesse, and excessive displays of power/wealth in order to keep the aura of importance around them. There is a reason why the CAA building is referred to as THE DEATH STAR with a mixture of ridicule and envy by others: it is a gilded citadel to flaunt its brand of power, fear, and ego like the scary Evil Empire in Star Wars. Their concern with branding meant that they didn't have time for the details of a) the overall well-being of their clients' career and b) the minutiae of contracts. Artists started hiring the people in the agency backrooms: managers to look after their career and entertainment lawyers who knew the actual law and contract negotiations. Now you have agents, managers, entertainment lawyers: all middlemen in the process to do a very simple thing: connect ppl and negotiate contracts. You only need one middle man...if even that. Some people get by on just having an entertainment lawyer to negotiate contracts, while the rare few artists broker deal themselves.

It's funny b/c once an agency gets you in the door -aka their main job- their power wanes. They lose leverage once you have secured a job, or start to know people in the industry. It is still nice to have them, but they are less and less necessary. I'm not at the level where I can do everything myself and pick up a phone and get a studio exec on the line. But there are plenty of artists who can do that. Steven Spielberg doesn't NEED an agent. Oprah and Leonardo DiCaprio don't need someone to take their 10%. Showrunners already know the executives and have power. If you think about the powerful showrunners and producers in Hollywood that's about 500-600 extremely wealthy writer/producers who could walk away from their agency tomorrow and still keep working. It wouldn't affect their bottom line or their projects, but it would devastate the 'middle man' infrastructure. Not only would agencies be cut off from hundreds of millions of dollars, but the aura of power would also implode...like a Death Star.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Operation Varsity Blue

There was a recent FBI busts for rich parents who were bribing to get their children into Ivy League schools. They were paying college advisors to rig the system. This FBI sting caused a massive backlash against not only the perpetrators but the kids of the aflluent.

I don't think it's fair to go after the kids of these parents arrested in Operation Varsity Blue. I can't judge their intelligence or aptitude. I only know that they come from wealth, which isn't their sin or salvation. In many cases, I have seen overambitious wealthy parents mess up their children's life by trying to nail down a job or college as if they are trying to say to the world 'See! I did it all. Got the perfect partner, job, home, AND my kids got into an Ivy League school. Tied up all the loose ends, I did it.'

I experienced things from the flip side of this reality. I was the one who was FREQUENTLY told that I got into Northwestern because of affirmative action. I heard this while I was in high school. I heard this at NU. The people who would tell me this was always white men from upper-middle-class or wealthy family. Now, these people didn't know that I was captain of the football team, wrestling team, and debate team. They didn't know that I was athlete of the year for my high school and in their Hall of Fame, that I was all-state and lettered, an NFL scholar for civic activism, a two-time wrestling champion for my district in my two years, that I had won almost every debate tournament I entered, that our congressional team won Harvard the year I was captain. These people didn't know that I was a reporter for 3 local newspapers and 2 online publications, that I took the SAT's one time without the aid of any tutors or books and that my score was high enough that a high school advisor said 'do not take it again' and that I fucked around on the ACT and still scored in the top 1%.

My parents warned me that ppl were going to say 'affirmative action' no matter what I did...and by people they meant white guys. My sister told me to never explain my bio to someone like this and that they weren't worth it. So, instead, I would just laugh in their face. This would unsettle them. They wanted me to get upset or justify my existence in their space. I would laugh and mutter 'you are so stupid' and then just walk off. Perhaps not the most mature way of handling things but I was a teenager and usually running off to a job or practice or studying. I didn't have time for haters.

Now I see that these were incredibly insecure. Their feelings are justified. The system was built for them so they have no excuse for not making it. When people of color succeed it is often a triumph of will or a case of overcoming obstacles. When white men succeed, it is often a case of just walking through the door.

I sarcastically told my friends that the scandal undermines the merit-based system of wealthy families paying exorbitant fees to send their children to elite private schools where they do drugs and fuck around for a few yrs until the secondary institutions pipeline them into Ivy League schools with the help of expensive tutors who teach them the tests they need to pass so they can drink and drug for another four years while their rich parents bribe the colleges in the 'correct way' by paying for a new athletic center or putting money into an endowment, or knowing a friend-of-a-friend who goes to the same country club as the college's dean. All of this is the completely legal and standard operating procedure. Why did you need to bribe middlemen when the entire college system was created and designed for the 'long bribe?' You out here looking like Boo-Boo the Fool for nothing. You didn't have to commit any crimes to win. Is this your first day being rich and white?

These parents are incredibly powerful and wealthy...but are also scared, weak, fragile people. They commit crimes, they rig the system, the write the rules. This is the group most likely to lash out if a person of color manages to scale the citadel wall of academia and make it inside. These days the only thing I have for them is compassion. They will never be happy. They are consumed by ego and live in a world without honest reflection. Attacking others is their only way of relating to different people. That is the saddest thing of all: to be wealthy in material and poor in spirit is a hell that many rich people live in every day.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Happy Accidents

Happy Accidents. I decided to switch things up and eat breakfast in the marina park and then do some laundry. Before I could sit down on a bench, an old friend appeared. We talked about life and he invited me to meet some other friends. I kind of wanted to do laundry, but I went. It was fun and I invited them to the matinee performance of “Confessions of a Cocaine Cowboy.” They wanted to hang out for brunch but I told them I wanted to go back to the hotel and do laundry. When I got back to my room, I got a call from Michel asking if I could meet two prominent NY theatre artists who are in town. ‘I kind of wanted to do laundry before the show...but sure.’ Great lunch, and then I go to matinee. Wonderful performance. Afterward, a Brit director wanted to meet up at the restaurant further down with a mixed crowd of Broadway musical writer, poets, and bartenders. But my laundry...ok. We met up, it was fun, and then I rushed to the hotel to grab my clothes. A local artist/bartender who came to see the matinee was chilling in the hotel courtyard. “Hey...lets have a drink at the hotel bar?’ Nope, I’m doing laundry!!! I go to my door and my keycard doesn’t work. I went to the front desk and got a new card, which doesn’t work. We tried 2 more cards and the hotel says it has to reset the system. It’s going to take 20 minutes. I am now convinced that the world is trying to stop me from doing laundry. Fine, I meet the bartender, he gives me a white wine. He introduces me to other artists. Time passes. They fix the door, I storm back inside, grab my clothes, get ready to go to Laundromat, and I get a call from a director. Nooo!! I have to do laundry!! Director says that if I need to do laundry I could do it at his apartment for free. I go over there, watch PBS, talk about theatre history. His partner is an architect and he tells me about happy accidents. He says ‘you notice that none of the tables in this apt touch the floor?’ Honestly? No. I’ve hung out in this apt dozens of time, but I looked around and he’s right: none of the tables, counters, and desks have legs. He talked about designing a table for this apartment and how each prototype would tip over, and the legs would be in the air. He had an epiphany that he could completely redesign this apt into a futuristic space with tables and counters suspended from the ceiling. The effect is a surreal, clean living space. A work of art that came about from an accident...just like this day. My laundry was done, they folded it, and sent me on my way.

Critics vs. Artists

I'm a critic and an artist, so I know both sides. I have gotten to a point now where I can watch a play, have an opinion, and then know with 99% accuracy how NY critics are going to review the same work based upon popular trends. The trend doesn't invalidate the art. But often it can appear like something is 'bad' when it is not in fashion with what critics are looking for at the time. When I was at Northwestern I started off as a reporter. I took over the film review section for the Daily Northwestern, and expanded into theatre and art reviews. After my first year, professors (like Susan Booth) pegged me as an artist so I started writing plays and screenplays. In my last 3 yrs, I was writing reviews for movies/plays and writing scripts at the same time. Reviewers are, for the most part, wonderful and inquisitive minds. But some critics believe that something in fashion right now is how theatre or movies should always be seen. It would be like a fashion critic who only praises designers who use a lot of buttons b/c buttons were 'in' the season they started working.

I remember a few years ago I saw a wonderful play at 59E59. It was a family drama, all-white cast, set in Delaware. The play was, in fact, developed at a small theatre, had success, and they brought it to NYC. I sat there watching this completely engrossing, well-layered play and thought 'wow, I'm enjoying this...and it's going to get destroyed by NY critics.' Sure enough, the reviews came out and called the play simplistic and flat b/c it lacked theatrical fireworks. It wasn't bitter enough, it wasn't cynical enough for the season. It had a whiff of earnestness and kindness (God forbid).

Conversely, I saw a pretty terrible play last year but it had the 'fireworks' in it to disguise the lack of heart and thought. I sat there hating on this play AND I was completely aware that it was going to receive rave reviews. It was slick, it gave the appearance of wisdom, when I found the work to be just cruel. Critics loved it. It fit with the cynicism that is expected in 'emerging' writers.

(Also if you are a woman or an artist of color, you face the double whammy of not only being judged by mostly white critics, but being judged in how they think 'minority' art should be presented to white audiences. What's authentic about your experience to 'them' which is a total mind fuck added on top of the universal mind fuck of critic and artist, but that's another post.)

No matter the season or reason, artists still need to do there work. We still need to hold our heads up. Maybe some of the stuff we do will be 'in season' and some of it will be out. But we should keep an eye on the long-term goals and dreams that drive us, rather than the trends.

Monday, March 4, 2019

GET WHAT YOU WANT: MARCH 2019


1. DRAMATISTS GUILD FUND FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: March 12
website: https://dgf.org/programs/fellows/

The ideas of today’s writers become groundbreaking shows of the future. DGF’s Fellows program helps create that future by propelling the most promising creative talents to their full potential. The Fellows program is a selective, year-long intensive for playwrights, composers, lyricists, and bookwriters. The program pairs talented writers with accomplished professional mentors, who help them hone their process, and find their unique voice.

This program increases the likelihood that Fellows will be able to turn their passion and talent into a successful career, impacting audiences around the globe. The Fellows program, currently headed by Michael Korie (Grey Gardens), Laurence O’Keefe (Legally Blonde), and Diana Son (Stop Kiss), is highly sought after for its uniquely successful format of partnering playwrights and musical theater writers together in the learning process. In addition, Fellows receive a stipend and the opportunity to partner with several arts organizations for Fellows-specific development opportunities.


2. WRITERS LAB (for women screenwriters over 40)
Deadline: March 14th
Website: https://thewriterslab.nyc/apply/

The Writers Lab is a four-day script development workshop that gives women screenwriters over 40 the opportunity to work intensively on their feature film scripts with the support of established writers, directors, and producers. The retreat takes place near NYC, but in the countryside: beautiful and private locations that minimize distractions and promote creativity and confidence. Through one-on-one meetings, panel discussions, guest speakers, and group meals, Mentors and Writers engage in a rigorous process that provides support in both the craft and commerce of screenwriting.

Deadline: March 14, 2019 (11:59pm EST) Application Fee: $55.00 $35.00 – NYWIFT, other WIF chapters*, and WGA members *(Members of other Women in Film chapters must provide proof of membership via a letter from their chapter’s staff or Board President.)


3. NYTW 2050 ADMINISTRATIVE FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: March 15th
Website: https://www.nytw.org/education/2050-admin-fellowships/

NYTW is proud to announce the 2019/20 Season 2050 Administrative Fellowship program—a sister program to our successful 2050 Artistic Fellowship, which supports emerging playwrights and directors. Replacing our current internship program, the new fellowship represents one of several NYTW initiatives to address the economic barriers that may prevent talented individuals from pursuing careers in the theatre.

For 20 years, NYTW has honed an inclusive fellowship program for emerging theatre makers with a multiplicity of perspectives. These fellowships have taken many forms, supporting playwrights, directors, designers and administrators.

The 2050 Fellowship is named in celebration of the U.S. Census Bureau’s projection that by the year 2050, there will be no single racial or ethnic majority in the United States. This projection provokes thoughts at New York Theatre Workshop about the transformations that will take place in the American landscape – technologically, environmentally, demographically and artistically. They are a catalyst for broader questions about our moral and artistic future.

We’re seeking enthusiastic candidates who are underrepresented in theatre administration. We encourage applicants with a unique perspective inclusive of race, color, religion, familial status, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, national origin, age and physical ability to apply. We are committed to diversity in all areas of our work, on and off stage. NYTW is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE), and all qualified applications will receive consideration.


4. PRINCESS GRACE AWARD
Deadline Window: Feb 15-March 15
Website: https://newdramatists.org/princess-grace

We encourage emerging playwrights to apply at the beginning of their careers so that through the New Dramatists Fellowship, they can develop their work as well as benefit from being a part of a unique, diverse, dynamic community of professional playwrights. An applicant’s status as an emerging playwright is evaluated during the adjudication process.

One playwright will be selected to receive:
• A grant in the amount of $7,500
• A one-season (September – June) artistic residency at New Dramatists, Inc. in New York City (For Award recipients living outside of the New York metro area, your on-site residency can be adapted according to your schedule with reimbursement provided for transportation costs to/from New York.)
• Inclusion of the winning script in New Dramatists’ library
• Advocacy for the recipient and their script to New York and National theatre communities for the duration of the fellowship, including opportunities to gather with the Princess Grace community, New Dramatists writers, and other theatre professionals
• Mentorship from a New Dramatists resident playwright for the duration of the fellowship
• Opportunity for winning play to be licensed and published by Samuel French, Inc.


5. ACADIANA REPERTORY THEATRE
Deadline: March 15th
Website: http://www.acadianarep.org/

The Acadiana Repertory Theatre, celebrating our 10th anniversary in 2020, is committed to serving playwrights as a place where they feel they can develop work with a company that has a desire to help in the growth of both the playwright and the play. We strive to create a safe, creative, open environment for our playwrights and, using our own experience, along with the experiences of some of our friends from across the country, we seek to help playwrights create and develop shows that have the best chance of a long life of production. Through developmental readings, developmental productions, and soon, the possibilities of residences, we hope to help, through working with the amazing playwrights we come in contact with, the voices of new American playwrights be heard.

We are now accepting submissions for our 2019 Season, which kicks off in in early February. We accept submissions of full length plays and musicals. In order to be eligible for consideration, submissions:
-Should be no longer than 90 minutes (we occasionally make exceptions)
-Should be full length.
-Should be actor/story forward
-Have minimal technical and set requirements
-Have a cast no larger than 10
-Should have limited to no production history and should not be published. We are looking specifically for work that you are looking to further develop and are looking for playwrights who want to be involved in the process.
-include a cast list and a synopsis

Scripts should be submitted in PDF format to submissions@acadianarep.org

The window for submissions will close on March 15th.

Playwrights will be notified that their submission has been received as well as if their show has been selected as a finalist or not passed through.

Please note: There are no submission fees nor is there a fee to be a part of the season. Playwrights will be responsible for travel expenses should they choose to join us for any part of the process.

To find out more information about us, submissions, or our past work, visit www.acadianarep.org


6. SLV SOCIA PRACTICE RESIDENCY
Deadline: March 17th
Website: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfr4ahOQ-8wbLu5hqx0B2VOKsVyBhQXPRYh8sCgEv4mPdZz7A/viewform

We look forward to inviting three artists, each representing the disciplines of visual art, music, and theater over the next two years. These guest artists are invited to work with members from our low-income communities, with the potential to connect to the rich Hispanic heritage of our region. Selected through this competitive call-for-entry process, artists from traditionally underserved communities, or with experience working with such communities, are strongly encouraged to apply. Selected proposals will result in performances or a visual work of art representing each of the three disciplines and highlight community involvement.

The inaugural session of the SLV Social Practice Arts Residency will commence in the fall of 2019 and run through November 2020.  We adopt the Alliance of Artist Communities’ definition of a social-practice residency as a program that primarily enables artists to engage in community-based work in significant ways throughout a residency. A social practice program necessitates residence because active community engagement and collaboration, and a local investment over time, are essential to deepen connections and address complex social issues in our region. The selected artists will be scheduled for 1 - 5 month residencies aligned with the university semesters. This will allow the guest artists the maximum benefit of university resources, such as facilities and student assistance, during their visit.

Alamosa, Colorado and ASU will serve as the artist’s host and creative home. Artists will be provided university housing and receive a stipend to cover project expenses. Upon arrival each artist will also receive an orientation to the SLV region, including meeting several project partners who will offer community connections to the artist, beyond the university, during their stay. The orientation is designed to introduce the artists and the community to each other, to help influence the development of their projects, and allow each artist exposure to, and feedback from the community.

The Social Practice Residency supports the creation of a wide range of projects through a philosophy of immersive discovery, discussion, creative thinking, and collaboration. The residency is designed to allow the artists as much freedom as possible to create projects that address our civic and social needs; therefore, the rotating position is not strictly tied to a specific discipline or form. However, it is our goal to select three individuals each with a background in either visual art, music, or theater.  At the end of their session, each artist is responsible for organizing a capstone event.  We are open to a wide range of project outcomes including those that could be fully realized within the community or those that are tied to a more traditional gallery or performance venue. All artist projects are required to involve close collaboration with the community, with participants directly involved in the process and result of projects.


7. ROYAL COURT THEATRE
Deadline: on-going
Website: https://royalcourttheatre.com/playwriting/literary-office/

The Literary Office is dedicated to finding exciting new plays that ask bold questions about the way we live now. We receive over 3000 unsolicited scripts a year from emerging and established playwrights, all of which are assessed and considered for development or production at the Royal Court.

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR
If you are a writer and would like to send us a script for consideration, then the Literary Office is your first port of call. The Royal Court programmes original plays that investigate the problems and possibilities of our time. Occasionally, we also present revivals. We are looking for outstanding plays which are formally or thematically original and are unlikely to be produced elsewhere.

Before you submit a script to us, we suggest you familiarise yourself with the Royal Court; come and see the plays being produced in our Upstairs and Downstairs spaces, and look at the archive and reviews of recent productions. This should give you a better feel for what we are looking for.

We do not accept one act plays or multiple submissions.

Please do not send us screenplays, novels, collections of poems or radio plays as the Royal Court does not programme adaptations from other forms. We will not read historical or biographical plays and we are unlikely to programme new musicals unless these have been commissioned by us. Unfortunately, we cannot consider resubmissions or new drafts of plays we have read and responded to, unless we have specifically requested a new draft.

SUBMITTING YOUR SCRIPT
Please send scripts in hard copy (double-sided if possible with contact details on the first page only), with a brief synopsis and covering letter describing any previous playwriting experience, to: The Literary Office, Royal Court, Sloane Square, London SW1W 8AS. Unfortunately, we cannot accept scripts by email.

Scripts sent without return postage will be recycled. We are unable to return scripts sent internationally so please do not send International Postage Coupons. Please use recyclable envelopes when submitting scripts to us.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT
All English language scripts submitted to the theatre are booked in and distributed to readers, as appropriate, from the Literary Office. You will receive an acknowledgement of receipt of your script, generally by email. This can take up to three weeks depending on the current quantity of submissions. The scripts are then read by a team of professional playwrights and directors, the senior in-house readers and/or the Literary Manager.

The reader’s report forms the basis of a recommendation to the Literary Manager and, where appropriate, may lead to consideration of the script by the senior Artistic Team at our weekly script meeting and/or additional support for play development through workshops, attachments or readings.

We read all scripts sent to us and will contact you to let you know whether or not we wish to proceed with the development of your play. We receive a large number of scripts through this submissions process; we aim to let you know the outcome of our reading within three to four months of acknowledging receipt but it can take us longer than this to fully consider plays.


8. LARK PLAYWRIGHTS’ WEEK
Deadline: April 1st
Website: https://www.larktheatre.org/

Playwrights’ Week is an annual, intensive, seven-day festival designed to foster a peer-based community among a cohort of writers with new work in development. Playwrights’ Week 2019 will take place between October and November 2019.

Selected via a year-long Open Submissions process, we provide approximately five playwrights with crucial creative resources in a nurturing and rigorous laboratory setting, which includes a series of group conversations around the work. Each new play receives twelve hours of rehearsal in advance of a public staged reading, focused on the writer’s self-stated developmental goals.

Our support criteria emphasizes ambitious, fresh, playful, engaging, energizing, provocative, powerful, and theatrical work by writers with clear artistic goals who are open to a collaborative development process.

Important Information:
Playwrights’ Week 2019 will take place between October and November 2019.
Each applicant should expect a confirmation of application receipt in April 2019 and a final response in September 2019.
While there is no official minimum number of pages for submitted full-length plays, we do not accept 10-minute plays or musicals.
Previously produced plays ARE eligible for consideration.
Plays previously submitted to this program are accepted, but we strongly encourage the submission of new work.
Writers living outside of the U.S. can apply if the script was originally written in English.
Due to the volume of submissions to this program, we will be unable to accept revised scripts during the selection process.
Housing and travel will be provided for all out of town writers.
Email any other questions to: submissions@larktheatre.org.

A complete submission is composed of two parts:

A completed application form.
A full-length script, with your name or any identifying information removed as we are committed to an anonymous initial review.
Download the Application Form:
 Playwrights' Week 2019 Application Form (84.8 KB)

Please review the following SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Submit ONE completed application and ONE full-length play.
No more than ONE play per playwright will be considered.
List only the play title on the cover page. No personal information.
Submit only .doc or PDF files as attachments.
Please EMAIL your script and completed application as two separate attachments in the same email to: submissions@larktheatre.org


9. LIBERATION THEATRE COMPANY WRITERS’ RESIDENCY
Deadline: April 1st
Website: https://liberationtheatrecompany.submittable.com/submit/5c907b4a-3660-476a-8ac0-e896f892b304/liberation-theatre-company-writing-residency-program-2019-2020?fbclid=IwAR3YxmKOdsQ6fr-lWocl8eRNN5MRWdvGjeVzq5gc-ac1PvMHpTNswCzEE24

Liberation Theatre Company (LTC) for our third year, is proud to announce Writing Residency Program 2019 – 2020 (supported by NYSCA and The Left Tilt Fund); furthers our commitment to the development of new Black playwrights for the American theatre.

It is a rare opportunity burgeoning playwrights have to hone their craft under their own vision through provided resources from an organization that only seeks to uplift their voices.  For that I owe Liberation Theater Company an unlimited amount of gratitude. Nathaniel Johnson - Residency Playwright 2017/18

The Writing Residency Program will select four early-career playwrights and provide them with dramaturgical and professional support over a ten-month period, during which time they will each be required to complete a new full-length play.

Beginning in May 2019, selected playwrights will attend monthly group meetings to share and refine their works-in-progress in a collaborative, energized setting; meet individually with LTC’s Artistic Director and staff who will provide additional support for their artistic needs, concerns and process; and have the resources of a director and professional actors during a table reading as their play begins to take shape.
Additionally, through connections with the larger New York City theatrical community, LTC will provide access to theatre tickets (when available) and seek to support, inspire, and assist playwrights in any way a small and dedicated company can.

The Residency will conclude in February 2020 with public readings of each playwright’s finished play. Upon successful completion of the program, each playwright will receive an honorarium.

Eligibility

To be considered for the Writing Residency Program all applicants must be a) residents of New York City at the time of participation (May 2019 – February 2020). b) Applicants must have written at least two full-length plays or three one-act plays. c) The applicant must not have received a production of any of their work that was more developed than a Showcase presentation under the Actors’ Equity Association production code.

Application Submission Procedure

To be considered for the 2019 - 2020 Writing Residency Program, Liberation Theatre Company will only accept submissions via this online form. If you have questions about the program or the application process, please email: info@liberationtheatrecompany.org.

The following materials must be uploaded and submitted in PDF or DOCX form no later than 11:59 PM EST on Monday, April 1, 2019. Make sure that all documents are properly labeled with your name.

Completed Online Application Form
Letter of Intent. This should be limited to 1,000 words and address all of the following points:
Your writing career thus far and where you feel you are in your creative and professional life.
Your career goals and how you will use the Residency to further those goals.
Briefly describe the play you will complete over the 10-month program.
Why you feel ready for a rigorous residency such as this.
Have you participated in a residency/fellowship before? If so, describe your experience.
Anything else you think may be relevant.
   3. A 10-page Work Sample that best represents you as a playwright
   4. The full script from which you selected your 10-page work sample
   5. Your playwriting resume (not a bio). Please include one personal or professional reference, with the person’s title or institutional affiliation, phone number and email address. (Referrer must be someone familiar with you and your work.)


10. SANTE FE INSTITUTE INTERNATIONAL THEMATIC RESIDENCY PROGRAM
Deadline: April 1st
Website: https://sfai.org/eligibility-how-to-apply/

The International Thematic Residency Program invites artists and creative practitioners of all disciplines to apply for a one- to three-month residency program. Residents receive lodging, studio space, and access to programmed events to promote their work and practice, and individuals, collaboratives, and families are welcome to apply.

The core of SFAI’s International Thematic Residency Program is a curated community of diverse creative practitioners living and working together within a shared space, and which requires good interpersonal abilities. All of our programming and partnerships are designed to support thought-provoking conversations and inspire action around social justice, cultural freedom, and environmental responsibility in a safe and supportive space where the sharing of diverse experiences and approaches is celebrated.

There is a $35 fee to apply.


11. FADE TO BLACK FESTIVAL
Deadline: April 1st
website: https://monologuebank.submittable.com/submit/75ef900d-f987-4e0f-801d-934965b19f69/fade-to-black-play-festival-2019?fbclid=IwAR3Sot_Fv4ityiorE7QAqgpLOY6E3IaVpAUPz_e11p9_crhsjTuCVz3GyuU

SCRIPT SUBMISSIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FROM FEBRUARY 1, 2019 TO APRIL 1, 2019.
No fee is required.
No restriction of theme or genre.
Three (3) scripts submissions are allowed per playwright.
Selected playwright winners will be awarded a cash prize of $100.00.

TO QUALIFY:
You must be the sole African-American author of the submitted work.
Playwright must publicly and openly identify themselves as African-American, Black, or of the African diaspora.
Previously published or produced work by the author or theatre/company is not allowed (See definitions below).
Play must run no longer than 8-10 minutes long on stage. Consider conducting an informal reading to ensure).
Play should accommodate a “bare-stage” set requiring only a minimum of removable stage props and require basic lighting and sound cues.
Play must not be a musical.
Play must not be written for children or youth.
Play must not contain characters that are under 17 years old.
Play must not be a re-submission of previous Fade To Black play festival seasons.
Play must not be considered a translation or adaptation.
Play must not be a film. Screenplays will not be accepted.
Play should be "stand-alone", separate body of work that has not been extracted from a larger, previously written play.
Author must be at least 18 years of age.
Play must be submitted in a PDF format.

DEFINITIONS:
"Produced” - Your play was marketed for production date(s) by either you (its playwright) or a theatre company and was performed before an audience who purchased tickets to see the event.
"Published" - Your play is an officially published work and commands royalties from the producing theater each time it is performed.
Staged readings (formal or informal) are not considered productions. If your play has only had public or private readings but has not been produced as a full-scale stage performance, you are permitted to submit the play.


12. 2020 ATELIER MONDIAL RESIDENCY FOR NYC ARTISTS
Deadline: April 7th
Website: www.residencyunlimited.org/2020-atelier-mondial-residency-for-new-york-city-artists/

RU is proud to announce its sixth open call for New York City-based artists for a 6 month residency at the Atelier Mondial (formerly International Studio and Exchange Program of the Basel Region - iaab) in Basel, Switzerland. This is an exchange program wherein RU hosts a Swiss-based artist in New York City during the same period. The residency program is generously supported by the Zaeslin-Bustany Scholarship.

CONDITIONS

The Atelier Mondial offers a 850 square foot working and living space from January 1 to June 30, 2020, an allowance of $1,200 per month while in Switzerland to cover day to day living costs and a roundtrip flight Switzerland <-> New York. The artist will also receive a 'reduced tarif' public transport card for all public transportation in Switzerland.

RESIDENCY FEATURES

In 2014 the Atelier Mondial facilities were been relocated to a newly constructed building complex at Freilager-Platz at Dreispitz, an emerging art zone just behind the Swiss railway station. Located very close to the Schaulager and the Helsinki building – by the architects Herzog & de Meuron – and directly vis-à-vis the new Academy of Art and Design Basel (HGK FHNW ), the Atelier Mondial studios, along with a number of new ‘off’ or alternative spaces and galleries, are now part of the growing Campus of the Arts. The House of Electronic Arts Basel (HeK) is located on the ground floor of the new Atelier Mondial complex at Freilager-Platz 10, where guest artists from around the world will be staying on the first floor.

Basel is a major Swiss cultural and industrial city in the tri-border area where Switzerland, Germany and France meet. It has a rich cultural heritage (e.g., such famous inhabitants include Erasmus, Holbein, Böcklin, Burckhardt, Nietzsche, etc.), ongoing traditions and vital and diverse range of cultural activities (e.g., theater, music, dance, film, etc.) Many of its museums (e.g., Kunstmuseum Basel /Museum of Contemporary Art, Schaulager, Kunsthalle Basel , Fondation Beyeler, Museum der Kulturen, Tinguely Museum, Antikenmuseum Basel and Sammlung Ludwig, etc.), as well as its contemporary architecture , are renowned worldwide. A lively alternative cultural scene complements the prominent public and private institutions.


13. NEW VOICES FELLOWSHIP
Deadline: April 15th
Website: https://www.larktheatre.org/get-involved/submit-play/

The New Voices Fellowship supports playwrights of color under 30 who demonstrate financial need. During a year-long residency, Fellows will work on multiple artistic projects through an individually-tailored program of Lark play development programs, and form relationships with other theater-makers at various career stages from all parts of the world. Fellowship includes a cash award of $15,000, plus an Opportunity Fund of $3,000 for the purposes of travel, research, autonomous workshops, or other work-related expenses, along with access to a wide range of Lark resources, including artistic program participation, office and rehearsal space, and staff support.

14. A STUDIO IN THE WOODS: ADAPTATION RESIDENCY
Deadline: April 22nd
Website: http://www.astudiointhewoods.org/apply-for-adaptations-living-with-change/

New Orleans and the region are frequently invoked as one of the areas most vulnerable to the effects of environmental change. Our highly manipulated landscape can be seen as a microcosm of the global environment, manifesting both the challenges and possibilities inherent in the ways humans interact with urban and natural ecosystems. With nearly half of the world’s population living within 40 miles of a coastline with rising seas, the concerns of Southern Louisiana resonate globally. Adaptations Residencies invite artists to examine how climate-driven adaptations – large and small, historic and contemporary, cultural and scientific – shape our future. Adaptations Residencies will provide artists with time, space, scholarship and staff support to foster critical thinking and creation of new works. The call is open to artists of all disciplines who have demonstrated an established dialogue with environmental and culturally related issues and a commitment to seeking and plumbing new depths. We ask artists to describe in detail how the region will affect their work, to propose a public component to their residency and to suggest ways in which they will engage with the local community. Direct questions to Cammie Hill-Prewitt at info@astudiointhewoods.org

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS
Proposals are due April 22nd and residencies will be awarded by June 14th, 2019.

DATES
Residencies are 6 weeks and will take place between September 2019 and May 2020. Flexibility in your dates is appreciated as we try to accommodate everyone’s schedules.

ARTIST ELIGIBILITY
Visual, musician/composing, performance, literary, new media, and interdisciplinary artists are eligible to apply. Both established and emerging artists may apply, but a rigorous work ethic and demonstrated commitment to public engagement are expected.  Artists of color are encouraged to apply and we are particularly interested in receiving applications from indigenous artists. Students are not eligible. Collaborative teams of up to two artists can be in residence, please contact info@astudiointhewoods.org for instructions on how to apply as a collaborative team.

SELECTION PROCESS
A multidisciplinary jury will judge proposals on the following criteria:

The creativeness and integrity of the proposal
Demonstrated ability to collaborate with colleagues and wider audiences
The proposal’s public component and its depth of engagement with the community

SUPPORT
Recipients will be provided $2500 as a stipend and $2000 towards materials. Artists will also have the opportunity to work with an external evaluator/ally. Depending on the needs of the project, we may be able to assist artists in accessing Tulane University faculty consultants or research collections. ASITW provides full room and board including food, utilities for living and studio space to selected residents. Residents are expected to cover personal living expenses, additional materials and supplies, and any other expenses relating to the cost of producing work incurred while in the program. Travel and shipping expenses to and from ASITW for the residency are also the responsibility of the artist.

***UPDATE***


15. DJERASSI PROGRAM
Deadline: March 15th
website: http://djerassi.org/apply/artist-residencies/

Residencies are awarded competitively, at no cost, to national and international artists in the disciplines of choreography, literature, music composition, visual arts, media arts, and science. There are 6 residency sessions each year: 5 are 4 weeks long and 1 that includes Open House/Open Studios is 5 weeks long. One session is devoted to Scientific Delirium Madness and the intersection of art and science. No shortened or partial residencies are offered.

We seek applications from emerging and mid-career artists, for whom appointments as resident artists may make a significant difference to their careers, as well as from established artists with national and/or international reputations. Applicants are evaluated by panels of arts professionals in each category.

Djerassi Program is designed as a retreat experience to pursue personal creative work and share collegial interaction within a small community of artists. In this spirit residents are expected to commit themselves for the entire residency session they are awarded.

Our Program chef prepares communal dinners Monday through Friday, and provisions both kitchens. Residents prepare their own breakfasts, lunches, and weekend dinners using ingredients supplied by the Program. We offer vegetarian and gluten free meals, although we cannot guarantee a gluten free environment.

Location and Transportation
Djerassi Program is located in a spectacular rural setting in the Santa Cruz Mountains over-looking the Pacific Ocean, yet is within easy driving distance of San Francisco and the rest of the Bay Area. There is no access to public transportation from the Ranch. Rides to Palo Alto for errands are provided by the staff at least once a week. Transportation to and from the San Francisco International Airport (SFO) is provided by the Program on the first and last day of each session.


16. So-Fi Festival
Deadline: March 18th
website: https://www.so-fi-festival.com/

Are you a solo theatermaker who uses film, dance, music, sculpture, food or another multidisciplinary medium to tell stories?

We want you to apply to our festival.

The So-fi Festival launched in Nov 2018, as new a low-fi, high-concept, multidisciplinary festival for solo works. We define multidisciplinary work as a work that uses multiple artistic mediums which are all integral to the storytelling. Examples are, but not limited to: film, photography, VR, sculpture, dance, experimental music/sound, puppetry, culinary arts, photography, etc. We define solo work as work that primarily features one performer.

So-fi and Torn Page are co-producers of the So-fi festival and partner with artists who can co-present their works in our festival. We strongly believe that artists should be paid for their work and set out to create an affordable opportunity for artists not only to recoup production fees but to profit as well.

WHAT WE OFFER:

A small but competitively curated festival that allows us to give each artist personal attention.

A robust pr and marketing campaign for each show and the overall festival.

A unique and intimate performance space in Chelsea.

Photos and video documentation of each production.

Primetime performance times for every performance.

A small but mighty equipment inventory.

70% of our box office is paid to artists.

FOH staff and technicians.

Application Deadline: March 18th at midnight.

There is a $25 application fee


17. PIPELINE PLAYLAB
Deadline: March 17th
website: https://pipelinetheatre.org/second-stage/playlab/playlab-class-of-2020-application/

What is PlayLab?
A playwrights group that aids and encourages artists in growing their biggest, wildest ideas into imaginative and daring new plays. Through monthly meetings, workshop-events, and an artistic retreat, each writer is supported in developing their ambitious initial concept into a new script. At the end of the year, each playwright will have the opportunity to present their script as part of Pipeline’s Week of Extraordinary Risk.

What plays are we looking for?
In line with our vision (below!), we want you to send us your most impossible idea for a play that you are dying to write. We are looking for plays that bend the rules, and playwrights who crave a space in which they can dive into new, uncharted territory. We are interested in fostering projects in their earliest stages of conception – the closer you are to first putting pen to paper, the better!

Our vision: we believe that an unbridled imagination is a force of magic with the power to provoke a more courageous and compassionate world.

Who should apply?
PlayLab playwrights should be excited to work within a collaborative group atmosphere, and enjoy providing and receiving constructive feedback. We pay special attention to building a dynamic cohort and encourage playwrights of all races, ethnicities, genders, abilities, physical presentation, and educational and professional backgrounds to apply.

What does a year with PlayLab look like?
The group will spend a year meeting on a monthly basis, sharing pages, and receiving constructive feedback from their fellow writers and the artistic staff of Pipeline. At three points in the year, the group will participate in a Springboard workshop – a one day event tailored to the writer’s specific needs where they will collaborate with members of the Pipeline community (which, depending on the needs of the playwright, may include actors, directors, designers, dramaturgs, etc.) to deepen their exploration of the play. In the spring, the group will go on retreat with the Pipeline ensemble to read their first drafts out loud, get away from the city for some dedicated writing time, and probably play Capture the Flag (be sure to stretch first…there have been injuries). At the end of the year, each playwright will present their play as part of Pipeline’s Week of Extraordinary Risk.

Throughout the season, Pipeline’s artistic team will work closely with each writer to determine ideal goals and writing deadlines to help maintain steady progress leading towards their reading.

Though the primary aim of the PlayLab is to support playwrights in turning their biggest, wildest ideas into finished first drafts, our secondary aim is to expand each playwright’s creative network, and in doing so also build Pipeline’s community. Through Week of Extraordinary Risk, Springboards, and the retreat, we introduce our PlayLab playwrights to our large and vibrant artistic network, while also inviting each playwright to bring in their own contacts to work with us. In this way, PlayLab playwrights can expect to walk away from the program with an exciting new roster of artists to work with for years to come.